An aloe Ferox drink bottled as Docsemur. The main ingredient is the Cape Aloe Ferox and here below are the details of this plant.

Aloe Common Names: (ALOECAE Family)
Red Aloe, Bitter Aloe, Cape Aloe (English); iNhlaba (Zulu); iKhala (Xhosa), Bitteraalwyn, Bergaalwyn (Afrikaans); umhlaba (Sotho);

Name Meanings:
Aloe – from the Greek word for the dried juice from the leaves of aloe
Ferox – referring to the spiny edged leaves – “fierce war-like”

Aloe In South Africa

The Western and South Western Cape is known to have a large variety and abundance of the Aloe Ferox plant. There have, for many years, been much farming of the plant in the Garden Route area (From Riversdale through to Plettenberg Bay). The Aloe is prodominately abundant throughtout South Africa ranging from the Western Cape, Southern Orange Free State through to Kwazulu Natal on the East Coast.

The aloe is a robust plant with persistent dry leaves on the lower portion of the single stem. The fleshy leaves are dull green or reddish-green, with dark brown spines along the edges. The bitter yellow juice is found just below the skin.The gel-like flesh from the inside of the leaves is a watery mixture of pectic substances, amino acids, minerals, trace elements, organic acids and various minor compounds. It is said that the aloe has many wound healing properties.

top of feroxBright red or orange flowers (rarely yellowish or white) appear from May to August, but in colder parts of the country this may be delayed until September. The flowers are arranged in erect, candle-shaped clusters numbering from five to eight clusters per plant. The aloe plant attracts many bird species such as sun-birds, weavers, glossy starlings and mouse-birds. Insects visiting the flowers may in turn attract more birds

It has been noted that Jan Van Riebeeck,(1652), took the aloe plant, dried its leaves and made an ointment for various skin problems. The plant was shipped to Holland where it was used for the manufacturing of antibiotics of various types.

Medicinal Uses

Cape aloes is still an important commercial laxative medicine. The larger part of the annual production is exported, but substantial quantities are marketed and used locally. The popular self-care remedies “Lewensessens” and “Schweden bitters” contain Cape aloes. A. Ferox and other species are used to a great extent in traditional human and livestock medicines. The leaves or roots, boiled in water, are taken as a laxative, but also for arthritis, eczema, conjunctivitis , hypertension and stress. Leaf sap of several species such as A. arborescens and A. greatheadii is applied externally to treat skin irritations, bruises and burns. The dry leaves of A. marlothii are popular in snuff mixtures.

Active Ingredients

The main purgative principle is the anthrone C-glucoside aloin (=barbaloin). The aloin content in exudate varies between 8,5 and 32%, but 18% is the minimum requirement for export. The wound-healing properties of aloe gel are ascribed to glycoproteins (see Bulbine) and to hydrating, insulating and protective effects.

Pharmacological Effects

At therapeutic doses, the anthraquinone derivatives act as stimulant laxatives . Aloin is only a prodrug while aloe-emodin anthrone, formed in the colon under the influence of bacterial enzymes, is responsible for the laxative action. It is said to increase peristalsis and to affect the absorption of water and electrolytes.

Benefits of Aloe

The benefits of aloe ferrox are, but not limited to, Gout, Arthritis, Fibrosis, Diabetes, Skin Ailments (Acne), PMT, Migraine, Insomnia, Gall and Kidney Stones, lack of energy, throat infections, heart burn, High Blood Pressure, colic, Stomach Ulcers, bladder infections, hemorrhoids, shingles, constipation, osteoporosis, indigestion, tonsillitis A. ferox and other species are used to a great extent in traditional human and livestock medicines. The leaves or roots, boiled in water, are taken as a laxative, but also for arthritis, eczema, conjunctivitis , hypertension and stress.

The bitter juice of aloe’s active ingredient is aloien.

Dosage & Directions

It is a known fact that every persons metabolism differs and therefor the dosage of the Docsemu aloe drink differs from person to person. We have, through time, taken note on various feedback received from our customers and can advise as follows:

  • Shake the bottle well. Approximately 3 tablespoons in the morning OR in the evening. Due to the laxative effect initially, it is advised to be cautious and consider the time of day when taken.
  • Shake the bottle well. A 1/4 glass be taken in the morning or evening, preferably on a empty stomach. Due to the laxative effect initially, it is advised to be cautious and consider the time of day when taken.
  • Individuals have reportedly taken a cupful which has been sufficient.
  • Although we have taken time to investigate the dosage techniques, we cannot offer direct dosage information due to the fact the every body’s metabolism varies. It is expected that the user will experiment with dosage and apply that which is best suitable to their condition.

Please note that these are purely guidelines and therefor it is important that you take this tonic at your own prescribed levels. Docsemur cc, its representatives or owners cannot beheld responsible for any negligence caused on the part of the user in anyway.

WARNING:

DO NOT take during pregnancy. As the aloe cleans the body it may abort pregnancy. Although not yet proven, we advise caution or consultation with your doctor in this regard.

OVERDOSE:

Excessive use may cause severe stomach cramps. These problems are symptomatic.